Tuesday

A Voyge to New Zealand (1997)






1





PREFACE


'Translated and made better' is a 19th C. Jewish literary formula for works of this nature, that raise the questions: who is the author? who made the book?

A re-presentation, it was decided, is a renewal, a transformation, and that is at the least a useful thought, even if it may not be accurate.

In this instance the text of Joseph Sowry's diary has not been changed at all, apart from one or two possible errors during the act of transcription. The whole thing is presented here. In the accompanying poems the text is used again, and only rarely are my own words interspersed in any way.

The purpose of this work is to make poetry from the diary.

Joseph Sowry settled in the Wairarapa, and was three times elected Mayor of Woodville. He died in 1904, aged 66. His descendents are numerous and widespread.

Leicester Kyle






2


1



off we set to go

for Provendence to prosper

Us as Proven in the text



Providence Our guide provide

on Ship good

Provender

to send

god's good Provend





3


1

LEEDS
NEWZ
EALAN
DLEEDa wild—looking—mount—ainous—landlittle-ton

In the order of gods provendance a chance to go to canterbury new zealand oppned out to us the only way for us to prosper and to





4


1



I
could Not
tell
the
course To
Take
to
Queensland
No
So


During the years 1859 and 1860, I was employed at Sir Peter Fairbairns at Leeds as Joiner and Sawery I was dis-charged of the 7th. day of Jany 1861. After that I started to keep a shop in April of that year, but Trade been so bad Owing to the war we did not Get on well. And not seeing my course clear to get on well in england. So what course to take I could not tell. At First we thought that we would go to Queensland but No. thought we tryed to we could not Strangely in the Order of God's Provendence, A chance to go to Canterbury, New Zealand, oppned out to us. After very thoughtfull consideration and Prayer, it Seemed the only way for us to Prosper and to follow the Leading of Divine Provendence, so we Set to go. And we at once commenced makeing arrangements we broke up our home. Sold the goods and fixters (the most of them to Mr T Atkinson of 71 Park Lane Leed Yorkshire England) (he was our next door Naibur while we kept the Shop. In December 1861 and then we went to live with Father Strother who Lived at No. 27 Bk Hanover at Park Lane Leeds, whare we stoped untill we Left Leeds some weeks after. All went on well getting ready untill Christmas Eve When it Pleased the Lord to seriously Afflict our daughter Annie. Poor Love. She suffered heavy for 20 hours When it Pleased the Lord to releive her from her sufferings he took her to himself at 27 Min Past 4 on christmas day 1861. Well the Lords will be done, we must say, and with Job say the Lord gave the Lord has taken away Blessed be the Name of the Lord. towards her Interment we received 2$ from an assurance compy And I wrote to the Government to see if thay Let me off her fare
which



at 27min Past 4
on Christmas day
1861
2 past
a Firm assurance
(Blessed)
a very Nice Letter
on the death of ours
much Love one
I as Joiner
and Sowery
these the building parts
of death






5


2



Like the rest they fell
those 2 stombling blocks

A meney a other reard
Like the rest thay fell

and then the way was clear
to stand as enny other

on the path in is Garden above
where god plants is tenderest





6


2



Lead to Look Back

heavy at Heart
lest the Loved lost


which I am thankfull to say they kindly did, and wrote me a very Nice Letter on death of our much Love one Well know I was Lead to Look Back upon the much which had been said about our going. As for Me I believed It to be the will of god, and was tharefore determined to go Some said that we was fools. But that Is to Prove Meney a Good and honest Man as been Called that before I was. Others with more Charety thougth that we might do as well If not better At home. But others Said go you are sure to do well. Some Friends was afraid that we should be short of outfitt but with the assistance of kind friends, we got a very good outfitt. Some Said that the Voyge would kill My wife and the 2 chirdren but God stoped thare Mouths by removeng the tenderest Plant and transplanted it in is Garden above so that 2 stombling blocks was removed. My Wife and the Lad, Arthur, are as likely to stand as enny other. And A meney other stumbling blocks reard, but Like the rest they fell, and then the way was Clear. Certainly thare was Meney Friends Whom it was Palnfull to Leave but we hope to meet them all Again A meney In this world, and the rest in heaven. May God grant It. Amen. I Parted with my Class Mates on the 21st. day of Jany 1862 – we had a tea meeting on that date. thare was Present all Except one of my own class A meney of Bro Agers class and Past friends In all 60 Persons my own class Presented me with a Large Family Bible at that meeting as a tokeing of thair Love to thare leader. That Night I shall never forget As Long as I live. I never thoutht that we Loved Each other as we did, but the best of friends must Part. It is on dought for the best. may god grant it Amen During that week we got Packed up
we



thay gave me a
Large Family Bible
as a tokeing of
thair Love
to thare leader

I never thouht
we Loved Each Other
as we did

we hope to meet
A meney
in this world

the rest
in heaven



Others with more Charety thougth
though you dont dought that i was lead
some called that before was I
that is to Prove the much was said





7


3



poor sons
not to meet
across the dark blue sea

up the hill
to part this life
to seek sundry

dark the land
new land the sea
the road
in company

advice
poor sons a gun
and hope
Jurney





8


3



never to part
in the land of the blest
do not deserve
so much intrust


received much help and many presents from our Friends for which we were Glad and thankfull and I took leave of meney on Sunday night following I went to the Chapel for the Last time for the Present and took leave of our friends thair. it was a Painefull time but we parted not as those without hope, but with the hope and belivef that if we never met again on Earth we should meet In the land of the blest never to part again. Haveing sent 3 boxes of Luggage on satterday to London, we had on Monday morning the 27 day of Jany to pack up the rest and get ready as soon as we could. I bought A gun and sundry things and then went to the station after parting with my friends at home when we got to the Station we found a verry meney friends waiting to have a Last word and Look, though I felt that I did not deserve so much Interest. Yet It Is after all a Pleasant thought when I remember that We Left our Place much beloved. we Left Leeds by the 10 Min past 10 trean in the morning. The appearance of that morning I shall oft remember when 16000 Miles across the dark blue sea. And now on leaveing all my friends Except 2 and those my best and nearest, I would In my heart feel thankfull for all the gifts and favers that I have recived at thair hands And hope that god will bless and I hope that In the course of events I shall be able to help some poor struggling sons of Adam up the hill of Life. Haveing Left Leeds, we had A verry plesent Jurney to London. we rode In company with Dr. F.R. Lees, who is good company and gave us some good Advice, on the road as we went. We arrived In london at 1/4 Past 4 in the afternoon, And was recived by our friend Mr. S. Calvert we took A cab and drove to thare house at South Kensington where we remaned
untill



blest Last Look
beloved
bet rest

blest Last Look
beloved
must Part

Last favers rest
beloved
Last trean

Last Look best
beloved
Part Last



unaspirated open heart





9


4



Left
leave Leeds

leave
that great city
called London

i was tired
and have no disire to live their

bid
our London friends good by
leave our a verry meney friends

Part with my Class Mates
leave the Sunday School
60 Persons My own Class
must Part from Bro Ager
Pack

Leave our place much beloved
left Leeds by 10 past 10
after monday tea and Wash

A meney places
meney sights
bid our London friends good by
at 12 O clock in the morning

sail 16000 Miles across the
dark blue sea
it is gods Will
I do disire it

Well the Lords wil1 be done
we must say

leave the docks
at 12 O clock





10


4



We saw the ship
much Pleased with her

Chaptan said
at noon

thare we was
rought cast

when two Friends
Our strange Friend

I went of bord
good by


until Friday. after tea and Wash on monday night which we where ready for. We all went Souht Kensington Museum london. The rest of the week we spent in going to A meney places and we went to see meney sights that are much talked About when people have been to see that great city, called London. We where glad to find Mr and Mrs S. Calvert well and happy. And I felt glad that I had had the honer to give him a Partner Who as made him so comfortable. We saw the Ship during the week and was verry much Pleased with her. On Friday at a little after 12 0 clock in the morning we bid our London friends good by And went onto the ship their to stop. Thare we was amongst some 2 or 300 passingers. Strangers in a Strange Place. that After noon and the following morning I went of bord and bought A meney things that we wanted After that we remained in the ship, for of London life I was tired and have no disire to live their. On Friday we Tryed to get as much settled as we could, to arrange our berths put up hooks and nails for to hang up our tins &c After we had got tea which was that day of a very rought cast we were talking matters over with our strange Friend when two Friends, one beLonging to the blackwall free Chirch and the other belonging to the Church came to see us And we had a service It was a very good time. Every boddy seemed pleased and glad. After that we retired to rest for the first Night on bord ship we slept well

Satterday February 1st 1862
This morning we were throug getting ready for sea Chaptan said that we was to leave the docks at 12 0 clock at noon but all the cargo was not got on bord untill 4 pm I went on shore and bought Sundry things Such as Apples, Oranges,
f
flour



we went to see A meny sights
that are much talked About

we visted A meny things
and washed before going out

We all went Souht Kensington
had tea which was that day

of hooks and nails to hand out tins
afore we sail away



thare we was
beLonging to the blackwall Free Chirch





11


5


suckcide.

suck (s∂k), v.
[ OE. sucan, corresp. to L. sugere,
f. root* sug
Related by ablaut to soak]

– To draw (water, air, etc.) in some direction,
esp. by producing a vacuum.

suck–, the vb.-stem used in comb.,

-cide (said), suffix. l.a.F.-cida, f. caedere, in comp
-cidere, to cut, kill.

hence suckcide, suckciderish etc.






12


5



milk for Arthur
beer for Hannah
we have not forgot

got Milk
the Inspectors came on bord
all examed and passed


flour, small pot, mugs, Bakeing Powder, ham &c &c.at Night we had Sirvece on bord Again.There I was called upon to Pray. So that my Colours had soon to be shown before the whole Ship.We had a good time Praise God for that

Sunday February 2st 1862
This morning we let go, and where tuged down to Gravesend. we had sirvece of the Poop of the Ship at 1/2 past 10 0 clock. we had no more Sirvce this day but has to spend the day as we best could I should verry much Liked to have Paid a pop viset to Park but no I must be comtent.

Monday Febry 3rd 1861
This morning the Government Inspecters came on bord we where all examed and passed.thay told us that was to have Eather Milk for Arthur or beer for Hannah so we have not forgot to look after it, and have got Milk

Tuesday Feby 4th 1862
Early this morning we let go Anker and made off intending to get to Dover but No. the wind and the dark would not allow us.So we cast Anker in the Downs of Margate Nothing verry strikeing to Place untill —

Thursday Feby 6 1862 –
When we again shiped Anker and Let her go hoping to get round dover but by 10 0 clock we had again to Anker off Deal – their we stoped for 3 hours And then we once more tryed to get round Dover this time we suckcided and got out into the chanel –
Friday



my Colours had soon to be shown
before the whole ship to be shown
We had a good time at the showing
Praise God for that

I should verry much
Liked to have
but No
the wind and the dark

have Paid a viset
to the Park
but No
the wind and the dark

to spend the day as
we best could
but No
the wind and the dark





13


6



about a good bit
but we are all right
now makeing headway
thought i would write –



8 in a mess
meney are sick
Boxes & &
rowling about


best cook on bord
never been sick
Washing the tables
cleaning the floor


Awfully though
rather a farce
pots, bread, and Wemon
rowling About


4 Married cuples
you would have Laughed
washing the child
of Jobs you concive





14


6



Today we are
what is called
fairly off all Ankers
and cable chanes

I Say Farewell

changed Pilots he
he will go
to Lands End so to

our Native Land
is put away


Friday Feby 1862
Today we are what is called fairly off all Ankers and cable chanes are been put away. We have changed Pilots he will go to Lands End So to our Native Land I must Say Farewell

Saterday Feby 8th. 1862
From today untill Satterday the 15th thar was meney Changes.the fore part of Week we had rather Sou wind with heavy sea.After that we had heavy wind we was rowling about in the sea Awfully though it was rather a farce to see cans, Pots, Hook pots, bread and Men, Wemon, Boxes &c &c rowling About. I have stood it as Enny man on bord. I have never been sick at all, yet it is no Joke been a worker on bord ship when so meney are sick at A time. we are 8 in a mess that is 4 Married cuples out of that we have had 4 wemen and 2 men confined to Bed, and that other man was little use. So that I have had all do. You would have Laughed to see me sometimes Makeing gruel, sometimes washing the child dressing it, washing towels, Pots, makeing cakes Pastes and all sorts of Jobs you concive. Amongst the rest been on watch, as we have that to do in turn. cleaning the floor, Washing the tables. Arthur was not sick long, but hannah was verry bad but is nearly better thay all tell me I am the best cook on bord. It is considered that up to the present we have made A Good Passage. we lost part time At the fore part of the week owing to bad wind. we had to sail about a good bit but we are all right now makeing headway it was only in the past week that thought i would write an account of our
Passage



it would
have laughed

seem much
a farce

is rather
amused

yet you
was no Joke

I have
all do






15


7



We have A Minister of the church
we've had some sermons from him

thay were dry and surplass like
he's to much for me rich and Polite

he won't look after us poor chaps

instead as we get square and soon
we'll have a sirvice of our own

Mr Jebson will preach for us
see what it will do for us

Opposition is good thay say
we intend to try and see

what it will do
for the Public





16


7



the Ship is rowling Awfully
the wind does blow a gale
Every thing is on the move
and Every one does ail

Sick people keep thare beds
the well do fall about
And thus we spend the day on bord
when no one can get out


Passage so that there are A meney things that i must have forgot the ship Is Large and well maned, in all about 30 including offercers. they are all very civel and Obliging. Tbe captian and mates are very nice men. We have more than 300 souls on bord, including A meney first class Passingers. My next nairbour is Mr. Jebson of Hudersfield (and family) he used to Preach at the Exchange Hall, Leeds. we have A Minister belonging to the church on bordo We have had some sermons tram him. thay were far to dry and Surplass like. he is to much for the rich and Polite. Instead of looking after us poor chaps. as soon as we get square we shall have sirvice of our own. Mr Jebson will Preach for us. Thay say !that Opposition Is good for the Public so that we intend to try it in this case and see what it will do for us. We get our rations now all right and we that contrive are very comfertable. We might have been more so had we Known we would have brought meny things that we have not but before I close I will try to give a list of what I think A family ought to bring so that it may help some of you or some other friends.

Satterdy Feby 15 1862
To day we can hardly stand. the Ship Is rouling Aufully. the wind Is blowing a gale and Every thing Is on the move. Sick people keep thare beds. those that are well are continuly falling on to the deck And thus we spend the day no getting ready for sundy as people are glad to keep thare seats which some cant do for when the Ship Learches the seats slip from under them And thay are left on the floor to be Laughed at for we Laugh at Each others downfall Hear. we got on Pretty well untill Just after noon and then the Ship took on what Is
c
called



Hear
we laugh at
who goes down

on the floor
we laugh
at them

some
cant keep
thare seats

the seats
slip out
from under them

when
the ship
Learches






17


8



Down the hatchway
like A flood
it came in tons of terrow

the upper classes Got it
thay was right wet in stile

All the wemen screamed
some skrice
the sick jumped out of bed

those on the deck above
were swimming

all the wemen thought
we was going to the bottom
but god saved us from harm

the upper classes Got it
thay was right wet in stile themselves

Thus Passed the day
no ferther harm

so the day passed

though it was a course one





18


8



Get up at 10
to face the day
it learches

from side to side
the passengers
off pearches

it throws
and scalds
and chucks it down
the hatches

it bruises
burns
and at its worst
dispatches


called a sea or breaker. Well of the row on bord at that time I can not describe. it was Awfull. thare was meny hundred tons of water came on bord. those on the mane deck were swiming about. one Poor Lad (a 2nd. class passinger) had is Leg broke in 2 Places. the 1st. and 2nd. class Got it dredfull. thay was right wet in stile themselves – and much baggage. as for me I was talking to Hannah on the Seat looking into our berth. it came down the hatchway like A flood. Hannah turned Pale. All the wemen thought we was going to the bottom. The place was full of terrow some skrice some fainted. Some of the Sick jumped out of bed others Laughed at it, knowing the cause. but god saved us from ferther harm. Thus Passed the day without ferther harm though it was a course one

Sunday Feby 16th 1862
We have passed A restless Night. this Morning all was well but it did not last long For at breakfast a young Child got Scalded with the learching of the ship and the falling of the ship on her side thair was service on bord at 112 10 Oclock in the morning. Hannah got up about 10 AM been rather better. all went well until I about 1/2 past 2 P.M – when A large coffee mill fell down upon Hannah's Head, Cutting a large hole in her head clean down to the bone. of Course it upset us And A meney in the ship. we thought It might Prove faitle. the dockter said that if it had been on the middle of her head. That is About one inch from the present place it would have killed her on the spot, but thank God it was not so. so the day passed.

Monday Feby 17 1862
This morning the child as gone to her rest And
t
today



1st class wet
they was set
on the deck


some skrice
others retch



we thought it might Prove faitle
it would kill her on the spot so
thank god it was not so





19


9



This morning the child
as gone to her rest
burnt by the ship

when it fell
on her side

we thougt all was well

And today we have had
the first funral on bord
today at 5. 0
all was well

No throwing over
as some people talk

it was a very sollom time

all the officers
and all the passingers
and all the crew that could
attended

could not be
more solum

more solum service
could not be





20


9





small noses
smell the best
the orange
on Madeira


blossom on
the deep blue sea
30 leagues
or nearer


We are making headway
with a better wind
today It is A splendid day
and I am very kind

Hannah is much better
all now feels first rate
Time’s no heavy fetter now
because I waite


today at 5P.M. we have had the first funral on bord. it was a very sollom time. No throwing them over bord as some people talk, but a more solum service could not be all the officers and crew and passingers that could attended.

Wednesday 19 1862
Yesterday and today the wind as been driving us out of our course. to day Captian said that was withing 100 Miles of Madeira. he said that eny body with small noses could smell the Oranges with which it abounds. Yesterday we hailed the ship called Kinsington. she had been out of london 4 days more than us. she was bound for Canterbury New Zealand but we lost her in the stormy night which followed to day we hailed the Ship boswell bound for Sidney. She had been out of London 30 days, that Is twice as Long as us, and we left her and lost sight of her in the after noon. We sailed Faster than her, but she had had much bad weather. we are driving with W.N.W. wind which still keeps us of our course

Thursday 20th Feby 1862
To day we are makeing headway with a better wind. It is A splended day, not like a February day but like June or July. almost all are on deck the sick now beging to look better. Hannah is much better and all now begins to feel first rate. Time Passes quick, It is not heavy on our hands, for we have Pleanty to do. I have had far to much but I hope to have more time to look about. I have had something to do to get to write at all, noting to read at Present. It Is admitted by all on bord that I am the Kindest Man on bord, because I waite so well on my
w
wife



the wind as been driving us
out of our course
the Captian said
by Madeira
by orange
with which it abounds

the wind as been driving
the smell to small noses
twice as long as
the ship called Kinsington

W.N.W.
of our course






21


10



the stars
so bright i my life

as they look hear
to night

I never saw

it was splendid
At Night

the stars
i my life

My life
the stars

A good deal
of Dance

i my life
At Night

so bright





22


10


the STARS

so bright i my life
as they look hear
to night

I Never Saw

it was splendid
At Night

the
STARS
i my life

the stars
STARS

A
good
deal
of
dance

i my life
At Night

so bright





23


10



Keeping her the lady
just as I fancy
all the pleasures of this world
go rouling on the sea


wife (and the Sick) keeping her very much the lady. as Night comes on the sea rowls heavy the ship rowls very much, so that it is like all the pleasures of this world it is gone Just when we fancy we are beginning to Enjoy them.

Friday 21st 1862
During the Night it was very rough the Ship rouled very much. some could not sleep My wife Amongst the rest but of Course I slept as though she had been quite. the wind changed about 3 0 clock this morning it is W though it is better yet we want A s.w.wind that is the best for us. the Ship still rowls heavy but still it is A splended day (Just as I am wrltelng hannah Is rather carelass and as allowed Arthur to blotch my book. because I spoke rather sharp She said I was to tell you that I was ill tempered. that's what one gets for been Kind and waiteing well on folks

Saterday Feby 22nd 1862
This is A splended day. the wind has settled down and there is a Calm. the Sun is verry hot. Sick folks Rowl out of there berths, And are up on deck. It makes It much better and camfertable. And we know begin to like the Passage. we have got our boxes out to day. we are very glad for we wanted the things. All was right, Except some Preserves had run and dirty some book backs, but Nought much worse. At Night it was splended we bad A good deal of Dance on bord. I never saw the Stars so bright I my life as thay look hear to night. it was after 11 0 clock before we retired to rest.


hannah is a care lass
and as let Arthur
blotch my book
my bought book

that’s what one gets
For been kind
and waiteing well
on Folks

Blotched books

I tell you

hannah is a care lass
i spoke rather sharp






24


11



get up A compney
learn the drill
got the Muskets
with the sword
use our own at Drill

have a good Sargent
getting better
time to give
sword and gun
Learn the cavelry drill

the weather allows
to day let drill
our own defense
and Purposes
it will be a good game

Make Stright our shoulders
keep them Erect
for otherways
and purposes
all are getting drill





25


11



all is well
I am throug

We have service
at ½ past 10 o clock

and at ½ past 2
this after

by the Minister
discourse was on Noah

a very good one
better been more Ponted

just after 5
A Scotch Man
from the cabin Came

it was good and Ponted

a scotch toungh
sutes a Meney


Sunday Feby 23rd 1862
This Morning it is spleanded. all is well. I am throug Cleaning betwen decks (that Is where we live) We are getting ready for sirvice. We have service at 1/2 past 10 O clock, and at 1/2 past 2 this after by the Minister the Mornings discourse was on Noah. A very good one though it would have been better if it had been more Panted, And delivered more as if he meant it. Just after 5 at Night A Scotch Man out of the first class cabin Came and gave us an adress on the prodigal son. it was good and Panted though he talks A real scotch toungh which is not well for us to understand it sutes a Meney. So that we have spent A Pleasent day. it is the first Sunday on bord that as looked like Sunday. The Ship Is in her right course though the wind is rather Low yet it is Grand.

Monday Feby 24th 1862
This Morning all is well wind very fare though not as we would like. We are getting up A compney to Learn the cavelry drill we have A good Drill Sargent who as been in the horse troops 10 Years. And we have got the Muskets belonging ship to Drill with. us that have Muskets use our own at Drill. we are to have 2 and 3 drills at day when the weather will allow we have had 2 drills to day. after we have learnt to use the gun we are to Drill with the Sword it will be good Pastime learn us to handle the gun and sword in our own defence or for other Purposes Strighting our shoulders and Keep us Erect and do us good otherways. it is commenc­ed at the right time As all are getting better and it gives me more time Part of which I can give to drill. we had Proposed to have a sermon between decks from Mr jebson to Night. for A
time



though the wind
is rather low
the ship is in her right






26


12



devil of the single wemon
Matron of the single wemon
Dance at Night
for single wemon
devil is own way

in times of truble

run,
the Reightous,
and be saved

the single wemen
to there berths
the Dockter said

A shame

I was Certian
I was Certian Mr Jebson
(I Pressed)
that God was above
the devil

never mind the Noise
and the Apperance
of things
it prved

so we got rid of Danceing

run,
the Reightous,
run in to it

A good compney

first rate





27


12



it took better
with the people
all the people
took

it took people
better people
all put people
put

it to gather
put to gather
all the other
look


time it seemed as though the devil was going to have is own way, for the Matron of the single wemon had promised the wemen a Dance at Night And all the other people seemed to have gone to look on. I Pressed Mr Jebson to never mind the Noise and the Apperance of things for I was Certian that God was above the devil. And so it prved. We commenced singing the people came in at the same time the Docker had ordered the single wemen to there berths he said that it was A shame for them to be on deck at that time of night. so we got rid of Danceing and got A good compney to the service. It was the Largest and peacefullest compney we have get at A service. he Preached from God is A refuge in times of truble. Tbe reightous run in to it and are saved. It was a blessed time. we had A first rate sermon And it took better with the people than all the other put to gather. Praise god for that thus the Devil was defeated and our way approved and God praised.

Tuesday Feby 25th 1862
This day is fine. our beds and Clothes has to go out on deck for the day to air. It is like Mid summer. we have been drilled twice to day we have had A plate and Loaf stolen from the cookhouse so that we have to look out, though we would not grounble about liveing as we live as well if not better than we did at home we make a good few daindys though of course we have salt Meat. we never hardly Eat buiskets as we have part flour and we make Leaved bread. so that it is better to Eat and more like home. the ship is out of her course 3 1/2 Points still she makes headway


of course we have salt meat
we would not grumble about liveing
we never hardly Eat buiskets

we have part flour
we make Leaved bread
we make good daindys
and Eat like home






28


13



all saile out
not able to
outsails us

May god help us
to beat
the devil

to have
at hand
the Victory

hail
the sail
to our desired
haven





29


13


h
ail
the
sail
to our
disired
haven

god
help us
to have
at hand
a Victory

go
on &
beat &
beat the
devil on
his own
ground

all
sail
out not
able to
outsails us

WE HAVE A FARE WIND YET ITS ONWARD TO OUR DISIRED HAVEN ALL BEGIN TO BE MERRY NOW THINGS ARE GETTING
WE HAVE A FARE WIND YET ITS ONWARD TO OUR DISIRED HAVEN ALL BEGIN TO BE MERRY NOW THINGS ARE GETTING




30


13





once after tea
and once before
the dancing
and the devil


once after tea
and once before
the drill
when on the level


wind good
and after tea
bad drill
and noisy revel


heavy Sea and wind
wind good
wind as settled
a better Wind
a fare wind


Wednesday Feby 26th 1862
We had A rather Course Night And heavy Sea and wind, but we are on our right course we are making headway very fast though it is rough and we can't drill. we hailed A ship this morning she Proved to be Merchant Prince from Liverpool to Melbourn. she had been at sea 31 days so that we are better than her for time. She seemed to have A meney passlngers on bord we gave each other A right good Cheer though a Mile of we looked close and made each other here well. I forgot to Say that yesterday we was within sight of Land. it was the canary Islands. to Night, that is after tea we have had drill. Ship much steadier. Wind good. going at the rate of 11 Nots Per hour

Thursday Feb 27 1862
This morning the wind as settled and the Ship is know rocking like an old Pegge tub. we have had a very pleasant day. have been drill twice. once before and once after tea as the Ship is much steader. to Night we have ail saile out. and a better Wind going at the rate of 9 1/2 Nots Per hour. We have had service to Night. Mr – – – ­Preached he was very much confused there been so much Noise with the dancing, but we Intend to go on and to beat the devil on his own Ground May god help us to have the Victory Amen – – the ship we hailed yesterday is yet at hand not been able to outsalls us.

Friday Feb 28th 1862
To day it is A splended Midsumers day. we have A fare wind, though rather Low. Yet its onward to our disired haven. All begin to be merry now things are gettong on better and we are very much pleased with our trip – we have had
pleanty



rocking rocking
like an old pegge tub
but now the ship
is steader

a Course Night
and a heavy Sea
make headway in
this weather

a settled wind
a pleasent day
now things are getting
on better






31


14


Not asleep
no Not

we like

A Nice stiff
bris
is what
we like

let go
behind
(or aft)
before
the wind

to cut us out
she tried

but Not asleep
no Not

A fine rate
leaveng
the first
for last

Just tumed
the Laugh
in our slive

good day





32


14



I take no Part
I do no work
such work
to night

strange
you may think
thay Jumped A
great height

a grate menny
Sea pigs
dancing
singing
to night

we saw
after dinner
Going at A fine rate
all right


pleanty of dancing and singing to night – you may think it strange that I should note the danceing but you will understand better when you have been at Sea A month or tow. And have seen 3 to 400 Persons trying to fill up thare time and please themselves. Though I take no Part In such work Yet I have to make greater allowances than I should At land.

Satterday March 1st 1862
Today we have still A good wind have had it All day. towards Night the wind as got brisker and we are makeing good headway. All is as still on bord as on land A quiet sea and A Nice stiff bris is what we like. that is when the wind is aft (or behind) the ship we hailed wednesday as tryed hard to get ahead of us – She is reported to be a fast sailing vessel. she let go before the wind and sllpt before our bows and then seemed to make of to leave us in the rear. thay had all sail out at the time. And know she as tryed her best to cut us out but those on bord the Zealandla was Not asleep. As the wind was not so strong we got ail Light saile ready and to day after dinner all was ready. up went the frish sails. And off we made Going at A fine rate leaveng in the rear the Merchant Prince. 2 or 3 hours Just turned tabls and the first was as far last as we was. So know we Laugh In our slive. Know we are getting ready for sunday which I hope will be A good day.

Sunday March 2nd 1862
Late last night there was a grate menny sea Pigs or Porpuse fish to be seen thay Jumped out of the water A great height so that we saw
them



to fill up thare time
and please themselves
to try

as still on bord
as land

you may understand
may think it

a month or tow
at sea
At land
that I should note
400
3 at sea
to make allowance






33


15



it was A very good time
I remembered
now that I left home

that i sat at
the last time
I remembered

that I had left home

the first sunday in this year
I remember
the hearty Amens

that was breathed out thare

at the close here
all was quite
though we felt god to bles

breathe out
the last time

through the gate streat
on the poop





34


15



A good day today
it as been
A good day

a nice Air
on deck thire is
a nice Air

the wind as got right Aft
to night

as it was
the weather keeps
still

still
hotter
every day


them very plan. to Day we have seen A Menney sharks. Thay showed themselves very well. Some of them was very large ones. The weather still keeps as it was though it now gets hotter every day. And we begin to feel it opresive between decks, though on deck thire is a nice Air. the wind as got right Aft to night so that we are not Able to get as much wind as we was but are getting on verry well to day it as been A good day. We commenced (after cleaning between decks and getting washed and Dressed) with service on the poop the Minister preached about the streat gate. it was a good discourse he held service again at 2 P.M. after the morning sirvice we had the Lords Supper it was A very good time. I now felt that I had left home. I remembered tha last time that i sat at the lords table at park Chapel it was the frist sunday In this year. I remember the hearty Amens that was breathed out thare, but here all was quite, though we felt god to bles us. At the close of the afternoons sirvice we had a sirvice of our own. Mr Jebson Preached on the maine deck. it was a good time I could not help giveing vent to the hearty Amens. After that at 1/2 past 5 O clock Mr – – – Preached on the forecastle. So that we have had A full day. I have to Watch to night.

Monday March 3th 1862
Today we have A steady wind, and are going from 7 to 9 Nots Per hour. towards Night we was running at 10 Nots. When I was on watch I commenced to write out this acount on note paper As I was informed that very likely in a day or 2 we may fall in with some home bound ships. And I feel disirous to send wat I can by the first ship. We was to day At 12 O clock in
the



to night
on watch
I write this out

on note paper

disirous for
a home-bound ship
to send to home

I commence
to write this out

home bound
account wat
I can






35


16



on-one never gave us one
to bring
as we had liked

we should have liked
some to have brought

but our purse
would not allow

and our friends
had not given
some of thares

as thay had got

astonished
those Around
had not

throug showing
as thay had got
A meny given

We don't Expect
to see them again

Friends left behind

we have no likenesses
to show
but Annies

Poor little Annies





36


16



hot the sun is nearly straight over our heads, the north star is all but Leavel with the Sea and Is





37


16



all is well
but Arthur

he is porley
he is ill

he is worse
he is hot

about the head
swets dreadful

hooping cough
the docter says
with medicine

we hope not
in a place

we hope
he will be better
like this


the Lattude 18 so that in a few days we shall be in the Line

Tuesday March 4th 1862
we have A good wind and run At A fine rate during the Night. we have run 11 and 12 Nots per hour. This Morning we are busy washing we are washing sush things as will not keep thong some are already rotten with been so long unwashed but you cant help it at the commencement of A Voyge. It is still Midsumer and very Pleasant weather we have longe since lost all sight of the Merchant Prince. And the other ship that came Aft. We don't Expect to see them again if the wind keeps steady As we can keep Ahead of them. to day after dinner those about us were throug showing Likeness of Friends left behind. As for us we had none to show Except Poor liitle Annies, as on one never gave us one. though there was some that we should have liked to have brought with us but our purse would not allow those Around seemed us much astonished that our friends had not given us some of thares as thay had got A meny given it now begins to be very hot the Sun is nearly streight over our heads, the north star is all but Leavel with the Sea and is getting very large. To night the wind is good and all is well Except Arthur. he is very porley the doctor says ill we have got medcine and we hope he will be better in the morning

Wednesday March 5th 1862
This morning Arthur is no better if ought worse is very hot about the head. he swets dreadfull docter says that he is better sweting like that. he says that he belives it will be the hooping cough. we hope not in a place like this. But
there



washing
we are washing
sush things

rotten
ready rotten
with been so

sush things
as will not keep
so long
unwashed




the north star
is Leavel
and is large
the Sun
is straight over






38


17



fudge and Judge

the donkey is
the docter by
the Irish made

and Oaetmeal cake
to medcine

its under belle
bed to pass
9 times

good health
to eat its food

O fudge
and Judge
make Arthur

Look at the people
we have mixt in
Amongst us





39


17



hot it is
and splended

an sumer day
at home
is coole to it

half bed on
between the forms
and there I sleep
first rate

some sleep
on bords
on forms
or enny way

to night
between the decks
to hot

it won’t last long
that’s comfort
by my self


there are at present 5 in the 1st class and 2 or 3 others in it on bord. The Irish says that if we had A donkey and had to put Arthur under its belle 9 times and put A pice of Oaetmeal cake in its mouth and made Arthur eat some of it, He would be cured. Look at that fudge and Judge of the people we have mixt in Amongst us. to day the wind is good we are getting well on our road. at 12 noon we was in Latude 12 – 30 N. so we have made 6 degrees in 3 days thats good sailing it is extremely hot to day. An sumer day at home is coole to it but it wont last Long thats our consolation. to night it is very hot and opressive btween Decks. so that some sleep on bords, forms, or enny way to keep cool. Arthur been ill and it been so hot I got half bed on between the forms and there I slept first rate by my self.

Thirsday March 6th 1862
It is a splended and hot morning. we have all to come the forecastle from 2 to 4 P.M which allows the place to cooler though if we like we can be out all day except time for cooking &c – ­it is very pleasant on Deck under shade Arthur seems little changed. to Night the wind is rather low but still in the right course. I am going to sleep on the forms to night which I shall continue to do While it keeps so hot. To day we are in 10-30 Lattude. all is as well as can be Expected.

Friday March 7th 1862
Today it is hotter than ever but Arthur seems much better. The docter seems to think by the turn that he is taking that it is His Eye teeth. the Captain Said this morning that he expected to come in with the mail or homeward bound
ships



all is as well
as can be
Expect it

Arthur is the same

the doctor says
its teeth

Eye teeth
by the turn
he is taking

on deck
under shade

Epect it






40


18



I forgot

at Night it goeth dark
in the morning cometh Light
it is tropical

light comes
between 1/2 past 5
and 6 –
in the morning

light goes
just after 7
at night

goeth dark
and cometh light

all at once

It gets better at Night
after the going of the sun
but settles at the riseing





41


18



at Night it goeth dark in the morning cometh Light it is tropacal light comes light





42


18



give my Respects
to all my friends
and recive them yourself

to day
I wrote
a
list of things
that I think
people
ought to bring

I shall
not have
much time
to write

when the ship comes in



great the heat
that oppresses him
so makes him so
bad


ships so that I shall have to keep my book and this letter closely written up. You must give my Respects to all my friends and recive the yourself. I very likely shall not have much time to write when the ship comes up. the wind is still rather low but we are getting on very well. to day I wrote A list of things that I think People ought to bring to make them more comfertable – to day we are in Lattude 8-30 North. I forgot to mame that at Night it goeth dark and in the morning it cometh Light all at once. in the morning between 1/2 past 5 and 6 – ­And at Night just after 7. – Arthur seems rather worse

Satterday March 8th 1862
this morning Arthur seems better. The wind is still low. And the weather Awfull hot we have got orders to keep open our port holes. there is one in our berth so that it will make it cooler for Hannah and Arthur. this morning we had A fine row amongst the Irish at the other side of the ship the Subject was who had the most Lice Grand that, is it not. to day we are in Lattude 7.30. to night Arthur seems worse and very low. it is the great heat that oppresses him so much and makes him so bad.

Sunday March 9 1862
This morning Arthur seems better. the wind is very Low we had intended crossing the Line to day. but the wind as been so low. We have had service at 1/2 past 10 A.M. and this after noon at 2 P.M. last Night and Friday Night the Sailors rode the dead horse – that is they draw so much Pay before hand. the time is up this week. two Sailors get dressed they bend down togather the first wareing the Ears and other the
taile



Grand that
Is it not the lice
at the other side of the ship




Friday Night
the sailors rode
the dead horse


the first
the Ears


and other
the taile


time is up
this week





43


19



It is verry hot today

93 in 2nd class
in ours it is much hotter

86 on Satterday Night
on Friday 84

last night they could not sleep
and Arthur
was hot

you must judge of it
in the burning sun
yourself

This moming it is still hotter

there was no wind
the sea is like glass

we are going
though it is slow.

we have A boat out
now he is out

for pleasure

on the sea like glass

he seems much better





44


19



one man rides
another drives
A beesum brush
dpended

A grand farce

it is
you may
on that
depended


taile they have A hairy sheet on, and then one man rides. And another drives the horse (so called) with A beesum brush. it is A grand farce you may depended upon that. Again at 4 O clock we had service on bord the forecastle Mr­ – Preached during the service one of the sailors and the cabbin cook tryed to disturb the service by singing songs and shouting on the Lower deck. Mr Jebson was at the service been grieved he came down to them but in ail my life I never heard men get dressed as he did them. Hannah and Arthur lived ail day on the forecastle so that Arthur is a good bit better to night. it is verry hot to day. the glass stood at 93 In the 2nd class berths to night In ours it is much hotter. Satterday Night it stood at 86 and Friday 84 so you must judge of the heat out under the burning sun. about 1/2 past it rained aufull it was short

Monday March 10th 1862
This morning it is still hotter there was no wind early. About 9 A.M the wind got rather better so that we are going, though it is slow. we have A boat out for pleasure the sea is almost like glass. Early this morning we sighted A ship away Ahead. since that there as been plenty of letter writeing expecting that she is homeward bound and will take the letters. last night I slept well but my wife and child was very hot that they could not sleep well. Arthur was sick this Morning but now that he is out he seems much better to day we are In Lattude 15-13 – at 6 at Night we had a good shower of rain. after that it was much cooler we saw A water spout off the lee side ofthe Ship it was A grand sight. After that we had a good wind untlll 2 the following morning when it became very low Arthur seems to be rather better.


shouting on the Lower deck

a sailor
and the cabin cook
shouting and singing

My Jebson been grieved

came down to them
one sailor
and the cabin cook

as he did them
came down to them
as he did them

been grieved
get dressed
I heard




A grand sight
A water spout
the Lee side


After that a wind





45


20


to day as been A day of life

We hailed A ship
then sent A boat
for what she had for sale

and bought some brandy
casks of wine
some brooms &c &c

at Early morn we washed

during the day
2 sharks was caught
it was a spree
to see them jump
about the deck

thay was cut up
and given the compney

Today the wind was rather low

at 5 it came on wet
it came in stile
we had some fun
out in our drowers

with nothing Els
on bord





46


20



AND WE ARE MAKEING GOOD HEADWAY IN THE RIGHT COURSE AT 12 0 CLOCK TODAY WE WAS 5 MILES





47


20


Tuesday March 11th 1862
Today the wind was rather low and keeps changeng points. we are now verry near to the ship we sighted yesterday morning. We hailed her and then sent A boats crew to see what she had for sale. after that the captian went on bord her And bought 9 casks of wine and some brandy, some brooms &c – she is A french bark, 31 days out of one of the west ports of France. to day upon the whole as been A day of life. at Early morn we washed during the day 2 sharks was caught it was a spree to see them jumping About the deck thay was cut up and given to the compney it was very good. about 5 P.M. it came on wet it came down in stile. we had some fine fun meny of us were out in our drowers (for I have had some made on bord) with nothing Els on. we was catching water in our buckets then throwing on each other so we got A very good washing and plenty of Fun. after 7 o clock it was very fine A nice low wind. the Lattude is 4-11.

Wednesday March 12 1862
This morning A nice Steady wind which keeps it rather cooler. Arthur is much better though he coughed part in the past night. to day there is a good deal of fish of all sorts to be seen. To day at 12 noon we was in Lattude 3 – 40. In the after noon A good wind sprung up so that we went 7.8. and 9. nots per hour the wind was strong and very cooling it kept up all night though it kept us 2 points of our course. Just after 6 O clock I saw the sun set in all its splender it was A grand sight as he went behind the snow white clouds the most grandly formed clouds that I ever witnessed Looking like 2 great worlds one above the other. one Lighter than the other in its snow white curtain. Forming vast Mountians Hills and dails with
planes



he went behind the snow white clouds
the sun in all its splender set
2 great formed worlds I witnesséd
vast Mountian Hills and dails with planes
in the most beautiful Grandyer


spree (sprī)
[a slang word of obscure origin]
chiefly colloq. 1804
1. A lively or boisterous frolic, an occasion or spell of noisy enjoyment
(freq. accompanied by drinking.)
b. spw. A drunken carousal 1811

2. Rough amusement, merrymaking, or sport, prolonged drinking or carousing
indulgence or participation in this 1808.





48


21



I have been thinking
and talking
with Hannah
about you

Poor things
you would be saying
Poor things

thay pitch about
in the sea
and blow
at the door

the things
thay tumed their noses at
thay wish they had
now more

thay wish they had
this pie
that bit
this or
the other

We dont
dont wish ourselves
we go to seek
a home
A Land
good things
go further





49


21



at dinner
or tea
you would be
we fancy

at tea
before we

4
in advance
of our time
4 before

you ought
we thought
to be


planes in the most beautiful Grandyer. As I looked at that sight And thought that no man could paint it, I wondered How enney man could say much less belive that all had come into beeing by chance. Apart from the Setting sun there was no clouds but A splended sky in all kinds of culers sush as no paInter could put onto canvass and as I never witnessed. Arthur is still better though he coughs part it is the hooping cough and is teeth.

Thursday March 13th 1862
This morning all is well Arthur is much better than he was. we have lost sight of the ship we hailed. it made off for one of the south Ameracan ports after we had done with it. the wind kept up until after 9 A.M when it Settl down A little as we had a shower of rain at that hour – the wind kept up all day it kept us 2 points of our course at 12 at noon we was in Lattude 3.11. I have been thinking And talking with Hannah about you. of course we thought as we sat dinner or tea you would be Eating the meal in advance that is tea or supper as we are about 4 hours behind your time. And we would fancy that you would be saying Poor things. I wish thay had this bit or that pie, this or the other. then wondering if we pitched about In the sea If you heard it blow outside the door, forgetting that your wind has no controwl of our ship them wondering If we wished ourselves at home – saying you had no dough that we should be glad for meny things that we turned up our noses at once. of course there is part truth in the last remark. As for the first remark we dont wish ourselves at home for we are going to A Land of which we have heard good things about to seek A home where
the



As I looked at that sight
a splendid sky there was
as I never witnessed
in all kinds of culers
sush as no painter could put
no man could paint
could put

How enney man could say
How enney less believe
that all had come

Apart from the sun
there was no clouds
when it Settle down A little
into being






50


22



know
who
or
what
of
bord
to
night
the merrest
night
I
ever
knew
for
wisteling
and
dancing
that
I
never
saw
shouting
singing
enney
like
it
never settled
like wind
in
my
life
A
calm
now
is
Low
is
still
as
A
CLAM





51


22



god would
that every man
be rich or poor
should have

not in one day
the rights and prospecks
that god would

not found it so
a we expected
the working man

to return


the working man as the rights and pros pecks that God would that every man be rich or poor should have. And there is one other thing we had made up our mind to rough it doing so we have not found it so rough as we Expected though in reading it you may think it very rough, but remember it did not all take place in one day it may be that you may pitie us but we may live to return it.

Friday March 14th 1862
This morning we have had a very heavy shower of rain between 5 and 6 O clock. the wind settled down to A calm. it is very hot Arthur is still mending. during the Night the wind was never settled first from one point then another it came. to day at 12 noon we was in Lattude 2.58 – to day we sighted A ship on the East side of us we dont know what or who she is. to Night is one of the merrest nights that I ever knew of bord for shouting, singing, wisteling, and danceing I never saw enney like it in all my life. the wind is Low and all is as still as A clam.

Satterday March 15 1862
The last night I slept on deck it was so very hot between decks. I had a very good nights rest. there is no dew here during the night we had a better wind for A short time but this morning it is very low Again we are doing next to nothing it is hotter than it as been before. we are in Lattude 2 – to Night it is verry oppressive

Sunday March 16 1862
About one or 2 O clock this morning the Wind got up. And as blown well since. it is the South East trades wind. it got better about 11 this morning. we are going at A good rate though
we



you may think it
you may pitie
we may live




a good rest
last night
on deck


so very hot


no dew
low wind


to Night
it is oppressive





52


23



we had service at 1/2 past 10
and at 2 P.M. on the poop
and at 4 on the forecastle
And at 1/2 past 6 P.M.
Mr –– preached

And the word went Home
to the hearts of the people

it was a good time
on the Main deck
god blessed us

we did not signel
but passed Each other
it the distance
the wind to our side
it serves

to send them
to compny

And us to our new Home

God bless us
and all sorts of passingers





53


23



five miles from the Line
At one we crossed
we have got to Side of it
that we long wanted


we are not in our right course but only 2 points out. we are in Lattude 1-24 – we had a service at 1/2 past 10 and at 2 P.M. on the poop and at 4 on the forecastle Mr – – preached. And at 1/2 past 6 P.M. Mr.Jebson gave us A first sermon on the Main deck, to the largest compny of all sorts of passingers that we have yet had to A gathering it was a good time god blessed us. And the word went home to the hearts of the people. Hannah, Arthur, and I slept out last Night under A tent which I put up for us on the top of the upper deck We was very comfertable and we Left the beding out all day to air. Just after Evening service we had A tropacal shower. I got throughly ducked with fetching in the beds it was soon over and it was still squaly until midnight. the wind still keeps good.

Monday March 17th 1862
This morning the wind is still good. And we are makeing good headway in the right course. At 12 O clock to day we was 5 miles from the Line. At one we crossed it. So that we have got to Side of it that we long wanted. this morning we sighted a home – ward bound ship but we was so far from Each that we did not signel it, but we quickly passed each other it the distance. As the wind is to our side it serves to send them home And us to our new Home. of course we could not send letters with her but we are to send them the first chance. this after noon an old woman got much hurt by the falling of a sail stick the wind kept us going well untill 5 P.M. \iVhen we encountered A squale which set us going at A fine rate untill it blew past. when the wind settled for about 2 hours after that it blew A fine brese all the Night. it is very oppressive to Night betwen decks.


Hannah Arthur and I
slept out
last Night

in A tent

put for us
on the upper deck

we encountered a squale
A tropacal shower

I got ducked
with fetching






54


24



This morning we see
the importance of boxes
good strong air tight boxes

many of them have been dreded in
And the Sea Air getting in
as turned every thing Mill dewed

A great meny things are spoiled,
others being light are broking.
the Damp and Air spoils all clothing

People going A Sea Voyge
should get good Strong boxes
made Air tight,

well painted out side,
with good Locks,
cord and indges.

Tightly packed to prevent them
knocking about – every thing
should be perfectly dry

or Els thay Mill dew.
All Preserves, cakes, bottles,
soaps, ham, cheese, &c &c

and Everything of that sort
that will spill, Melt or greas
should be packed in A Box

by them selves very fast.
and the boxes Marked
this side up, with care.

boxes for clothing should
have partions in them
for Low hats and Bonnets

I suppose the high hat
is not used in New Zealand.





55


24





she past us
Like the other
yesterday
A nother

headway
towards good hope

South the wind
all day. I forgot


Tuesday March 18th 1862
This morning the wind still blows well. And we Expect to soon get out of this hot weather to frost and snow which will make us put on some clothing instead of going Naked or nearly so. of course we have been rather long in crossing the line but we have commenced well to make it up one good thing we have had no dead calm for weeks on the line like meney have. which is bad to bear under A burning sun with not A breth of Air. to day at 12 at noon we was in Lattude 1 – 75 South the wind as kept up all day. I forgot to name that we have been favered with good moon Light – Almost as light as day. which makes pleasant. to Night it feels cooler on the deck. – this morning we sighted A nother home ward bound ship but she past us Like the other yesterdy.

Wednesday March 19th 1862
This morning we have still A good wind. And we are still making headway towards the cape of good hope. This morning the boxes all came out, that is those wanted. Now this morning we see the importance of good strong Air tight boxes. very many of them have dreded in And the Sea Air getting in as turned every thing Mill dewed. A great meny things are spoiled, others being light are broking. the Damp and Air spoils all clothing. People going A sea Voyge should get good Strong boxes made Air tight, well painted out side, with good Locks, cord, and Indges. Tightly packed to prevent them knocking about – Every thing should be perfectly Dry or Els thay Mill dew. All Preserves, Cakes, bottles, Soaps, ham, Cheese, &c 7c and Every thing of that sort that will spill. Melt or greas should be packed in A Box by them selves very fast, and the boxes Marked
this



bad to bear
in A burning sun
with not A breth of Air

no dead calm
for weeks on the line
like meney

soon to snow
instead of Naked
or nearly so

a good moon Light
as light as day.
makes pleasant. to Night






56


25


At 3AM
we had A
shower
of rain
it soon
passed
over the
wind
yet
stronger.
we are
going
from
10 -11
Nots
per hour.
gone well
all night
to day
we are
in Lattude
8-43
South.
Now the
ship
begins
to
Learn
her tricks
For the
sea is
rather
heavy
to day
I forgot to name Onions in my list.
to day
we are
sailing
betwen
South Ameraca
and the
Iles of
Asention –
of course
we
could see
neather day
of them.
pleanty of close new washed as
with blown
the over bord to
strong
wind.





57


25



A heavy squal
with pleanty of rain
soon passed

At 3AM
a shower of rain
past fast


this way up with care.boxes for clothing should have partions in them for the care of Low hats and Bonnets I suppose that the high hat is not used in New Zealand. we have nothing spoiled haveing got good boxes for our clothing. To day we are in Lattude 3-39 South

Thursday March 20th 1862
To day the wind gets stronger so we have hopes of makeing A good passage after all. Early this morning we had A heavy squal with pleanty of rain but it soon passed over. after that the wind continued to rise. to day we are in Lattude 5-56 south. So that we are gaining Lattude fast when we remember that we get several degrees longetude as well which we lost on the other Side the line with running so much south. We are Lying As much to the wind as we can, but we are still gaining west Longetude. we are makeing from 8 to 10 Nots per hour. A home ward bound ship went past us to day but we are both running to fast for to send letters.

Friday March 21st 1862
At 3AM we had A shower of rain. it soon passed over the wind is yet stronger. we are going from 10-11 Nots per hour. gone well all night. to day we are In Lattude 8-43 South. Now the ship begins to learn her tricks for the sea is rather heavy to day. I had forgot to name Onions in my list. to day we are sailing betwen South Ameraca and the lies of Asention – of course we could see neather of them. Pleanty of close new washed As blown over bord to day with the strong wind

Satterday March 22nd 1862
To day the wind still holds good. plenty of rain
fell



we are gaining Lattude fast
5-56 south
we are gaining Longetude west
lost on the other Side the line
so much south
remember
8-10 Nots
8-43 South
remember






58


26


at 6 O
clock
at night

not A ripple to be seen on the wide Oachen

it is
a splended
sight

It gets
better
at night

the
most
that
ever
was
brought
to
mind

and looked upon

before we left our native Land


If I forget Thee O Jerusalem
(&c &c &c)


meney tender strings were touched

and meny vows

splended skyes
first rate





59


26



Today we are
in Lattude 11-57
the Longetude is 27.15 –

if you look
at the map
you will see
where we are


fell with A heavy squal from 3 to 8 Oclock this morning we had several sails torn with it. to day we are in Lattude 11-57. it is very fine to day not hot being much cooler than it was A week ago. the Longetude is 27. 15 – if you'look at the map you will see where we are. the glass stood at 82 In the 2nd Class at 12 at noon.

Sunday March 23rd 1862
Today we have had the same services As before. At 6 Oclock at night Mr Jebson gave us A first rate descourse from If I for-get thee 0 Jursulem, &c &c &c he brought to mind the meny vows we had made before we left our native Land. it was A good time but meney tender strings were touched. To day we are in Lattude 14-43 – during last night the wind settled down A good bit we are sailing slow to day. the Glass stood at 84 to day in the shade.

Monday March 25th. 1862
No change in the wind but the sea is almost like glass it is a splended sight not A ripple to be seen on the wide Oachen. to day we are in Lattude 15-57 – of Late we have seen some of the most splended skyes that Ever was Looked upon. some times the wind settled down to A calm for A short time And then the it gets up A little

Wednesday March 26th
To day we are in Lattude 16-50 no change in the wind it is very oppressive with haveing no wind


It is
very fine
to day
not hot

at noon
the glass
was 82
in 2nd class




wind still low
it settles at the rising


to a calm
for A time


It gets better at Night
it gets up A little





60


27



A good sise ship.
she crossed aft

who she was
or enny els.

about A good bit
but we did not like her.

had she tried
enny thing

we should have given her
2 ship guns
carbines and cutlasses
ball cartridge
and shot.

A warm reception

an other Large
but she crossed Aft

An Amerecan Bark
she made to us
not fond of our Looks

thay thought we was crousers

A tidy Little ship
not half the sise of ours

thay found us men and Brothers
not fiends of war





61


27



we hope
you get them Early in May
our letters
Letter Bag

we will be new Zealand
that is At home
we hope


Thursday March 27th 1862
Today we are in Lattude 18-15 – Longetude 29­-27 – the wind as got right aft it is rather stronger to day. All as gone as it generaly dose untill we sighted some ships the first was A good sise ship. she crossed Aft. we hoisted signels but we could make nothing of her as to who she was or enny thing els. she sailed about A good bit but we did not like her. had she tryed enny thing we should have given her A warm reception we have 2 ship guns and Plenty of carbines and cutlasses on bord with plenty of ball cartridge and shot. towards noon we sighted an other Large one but she crossed Aft but we never came near us so we dont know enny thing About her. About 3 P.M. we sighted An Amerecan Bark. we hailed her. she made to us though she was not fond of our Looks. As thay had been on A Long voyge and Expected that we was at war with them, so at first sight thay thought we was crousers, But thay was pleasingly disapointed for thay found that we were men and Brothers, not fiends of war. our captian gave us notice that in one hour we should be up with her and send A Letter Bag with her. of course all was comotion almost all writing to some Loved one Left behind. And know the ship is close by our side the bag made up, the boat lowered, and off she goeth to the Bark. she is a tidy Little ship though not half the slse of ours she is Winslow from Portland, though her cargo is for Boston that is betwen 20 and 30 days sail from here, then 10 or 12 more horne so that we hope you will get them Early in May. by that time we hope to be At horne, that is new Zealand. she is well recived by the Bark who treat our boat men with plenty of Grog and chat for the short time they are on bord. The wind
seems



a Little ship from Portland
her cargo is for Boston
20 and 30 days from here
then 10 or 12 more home






62


28



and now the bark before the wind
come back

signels up
dont delay
Eyes upon

come back

thrice doeth her flag come down
and dip

good by
good by
good by

away she goeth with Loud cheers

glide Away
good by

she goeth
with sweet rememberances of home

the half choked tear
the silent sight
to the eye
from the breast

steal over all hearts

but I must stop
and not describe
the feelings
of
the throng





63


28



the weather today
it is faverable
though it is squaly
to night
it is settled
to nearly A calm


seems know to get better and our signels go up (dont Delay) all Eyes are upon them as our men take Leave of the ship and come back. and now the bark is before the wind. thrice doeth her flag come down and dip, bidding us, good by, good by, good by. Away she goeth with Loud cheers and well wishes of all on bord the Zealandia. But the Apperance of that time I cannot describe. the very strange feeling which seemed to steal over all hearts as we whatched the homeward bound ship glide Away. the sweet remberances of home seemed to glide up before us while the half choked tear stole to the Eye, or the silent sight was heaved from the breast. In A moment we all seemed to be at home to watch the recept of our letter. Some (no dough) could see his wife and children, others Father, Mother, Sisters or brothers reciveing them and the Joy which followed. but I must stop I cannot discribe the feelings of the throng.

Friday March 28th 1862
between 5 and 6 this morning we sighted A home ward bound ship but we quickly passed Each other in the distance the wind is strong and faverable we are sailing at good speed, though it is squaly with plenty of rain. we have lost sight of sulky ship we tryed to talk too yesterday to day we are in Lattude 19 – 20 – to­wards night it settled down to nearly A calm Longetude 29-30 – 40 Miles from Land.

Satterday March 29th 1862
The weather to day is unsettled though it is very low we are in what is called changeables, that is the wind is not to depend on. we are in Lattude 20-3 –


The weather today
is unsettled though
it is very low
in the changeable
it is called
the wind
is not to depend on






64


29



A outward bound
from Liverpool

behind us
left
the Pride of England
far Away
left
the Same date as ourselves
to Calcutia

this the first of April
beeing
the Birth day of My wife

we honnered it
as we could
with Ale
A bottol

she dose not Like the wine so well
got Ale
it seems to support her





65


29



best singing
it was
a very good time

best service
since left Leeds

good sermon
from
My Fathers house

A compney
he liked best


Sunday March 30th 1862
This morning it is very hot. we are in Lattude 20-15 – we sighted A outward bound ship. we dont know yet what she is. we sighted 2 rock Ilands called Martenvez and trinerdadia – we was from 15 to 20 miles off them there is very little wind though faverable. we had service at 1/2 past 10 and 2 P.M. at 6 O clock Mr jebson gave us A very good sermon from In My Fathers house Are &c &c – it was the best Aranged service and the best singing I have heard since I left Leeds. it was A very good time. Mr. Jebson As begun to be Liked best by all on bard there we have no truble in getting A compney.

Monday March 31st 1862
This morning we have A better wind. it is stronger and in the right course. we are in Lattude 20-45 – we hailed the ship we sigted yesterday she proved to be the Pride of England from Liverpool to Calcutia – Left on the Same date as ourselves.

Tuesday April 1st 1862
The wind is Improveing. we are getting on well. we have left behind us the Pride of England – far Away. towards night it was very squaly with plenty of rain. in one of the squals we Lost our top tunsail and had the bottom one split from top to bottom. we are in Lattude 22-24 – This beeing the first of April it is My wifes Birth day of course we have honnered it as well as we could. we have no dough that it will be remembered meny 1000 miles from here. My wife Honnered it with getting A bottol Ale. she dose not Like the wine so well so we have got Ale instead it seems to support her better.


we hailed
we sigted
she proved to be
no truble






66


30


we have
to tack Just an going hill one
about like horse up from side
to the
other
gaining
about
one fourth
of the
ground
that it
travels
the wind
as changed
a few
points
so that
we are
able to
keep on
course
we are in
Lattude
something
over 29-
but we
dont know
rightly
as there
was A very
heavy
shower
of rain
at noon
the wind
as been
very strong
all day
Except at noon
when it settled
for a few
minuites
we are
going from
10-14 Nots
per hour
it begins
to be
very Cool at Nights –
hannah is
not well
at present
the quick and of ship Menny the sort long
sailing pitching the makes of sickly pull faces





67


30


Wednesday April 2nd 1862
During last night it was very squaly it drove us some times at A fine rate through the water this morning the wind came Ahead. of course that is nothing in our faver: it soon changed A little more faverable – we are in Lattude 22-23­ - later in the day the wind Again got Ahead. we had very strong wind all day

Thursday April 3rd 1862
We are in Lattude 23-1-50 so that in spite of head wind we have made nearly 1 1/2 degrees. when we have them we have to tack About .Just like an horse going up hill from one side to the other, gaining about one fourth of the ground that it travels. the wind as changed A few points so that we are able to keep on course

Friday April 4th 1862
We are in Lattude something over 29 – but we dont know rightly as there was A very heavy shower of rain at noon the wind as been very strong all day Except at noon when it settled for A few minuites. we are going from 10-14 nots per hour. it begins to be very Cool at Nights – hannah is not very well at present. the quick sailing and pitching of the ship makes menny of the Sickly sort pull long faces As for myself I wold not care if she went twice as fast for I want to see the New Zealand.

Satterday April 5th 1862
Lattude 30-27 – yet we have strong winds In Lattude we are the same as Cape of good hope though In Longetude we are several degrees or 304 miles off. this afternoon the wind As settled down so we have little wind and A very heavy swell in the sea. it is rowling us About
like



10-14 nots
per hour
As for myself
I wold not care
if she went twice as fast
for
I want to see
the
New Zealand






68


31



rowling About
like a ball in the sea

No change in the wind
though settled A bit

to day it is strong
we are sailing on quick

No change in the wind
run Longetude fast

Longetude 7 now
sailing on slow

During last Night
but to day it is strong

Lattude not known
This morning is dark





69


31



Last night the Lights
we saw
Large
to be seen

thay tried to get up with us,
we have lost them to day
in a stright course
for new Zealand


like a ball in the water. there is plenty of Large and pretty looking sea birds to be seen Last night we saw the Lights of a ship Longslde thay tried to get up with us, but we have lost them to day.

Sunday April 6th 1862
No change in the wind thongh the swell In the sea as settled A little. we have had the reagelar services Mr Jebson preached on Wisdom, riches, and strength it was A good time praise god – Lattude 30-56

Monday April 7 1862
During Last Night A faverable wind got up and to day it is very strong we are sailing quick. to day we have overtaken A large german ship out ward bound. we quickly passed her. Lattude 32-25

Tuesday April 8th 1862
No change in the wind. Lattude 34-43 ­- Longetude 10-10 – so that we are now 13 miles in Lattude past the cape town we are running Longetude very fast so that we shall soon round cape in in A stright course for new Zealand.

Wednesday April 9th 1862
Longetude 7-40W. Lattude 36-14 – Yesterday Night we had some rain with and after that the wind fell to day we are sailing very slow

Thursday April 10th 1862
Lattude 36-57 Longetude 6-22W – During last Night A head wind got up. to day it is very strong.

Friday April 11th 1862
Lattude not known Longetude not known This morning it is dark and gloomy. the ship heaving
and



Mr Jebson preached
Wisdom
riches
strength ––
Lattude 30
-56






70


32



dark and gloomy
pitching Awfull
rowling high
tempest tost
drunk

put in irons
no crew
asleep

the rest refused to come to work
all there rations to be stoped
A Lot of drunken fellows

runing up
and
runing down
in ship
obeying
orders
Midshipmen
Apprentices
duch sailor
sail maker
all carpinters
all offercers
to help us
first rate crew
free men

the Captian gave out cutlasses
for guard
and for reserve





71


32



one duch sailor
did
the sailors threw his
close
he would cut there
throtes
36 young men
could


and pitching Awfull, the sea rowling high. the wind rageing with fury. rain falling fast so that we are tempest tost. that seems bad but worse than that we are without sailors almost. Last night some way that I cant yet Explane the sailors got plenty of grog and when the storm came on thay was drunk and asleep. during the night the officers had to reef the sails to save the ship. In the morning one of the Sailors came out and insulted the captian. after he had takeing A good bit from him he was put in Irons. the rest refused to come to work. one duch sailor did all he could to help to officers. the sailors threw his box and Close over bard and all he had excep bedding. had he had his will he would have gone and cut there throtes, but the boatswane got him to go to the captian and he got promeses of some kind from the captian. the men now came aft and captlan told hem he would not give him thire mate up and if thay liked they need not work enny more, but he gave orders for all there rations to be stopped, but we was determanded that the captlan should not be ruled by A Lot of drunken fellows. So we drew up A List and 36 young men offered themselves to help all we could. Amongst us we are 10 Able sea men the captlan thanked us and we went to work. you would have been Astonished to have seen us runing up and down In ship obaying orders. we have the Midshipmen and Apprentices, sailmaker, butcher, Dutch sailor, ail carpinters and all offercers to help us. that we have a first rate crew, all free men. towards night we arranged A strong wach for deck and below to be relived every 4 hours the Captian gave out all cutlasses for guard and reserve lest thay should attempt to relese thar mate or take the ship. by
this



tempest tost
with fury

reef sails
and save the ship

that seems bad
but worse

in some way
that I cant Explane
no crew
almost






72


33



the drink to die
the currage with it
sailors in thare sober senses

work on enny terms
orgive
the captian said

let them of now in the morning
go to bed
and rested get
thay went

now the wind as set a bit
settling rain
the sea

look out
and work

this dreary night

passed well
the Night
nice breese

the sailors aft
Poor fellows
hung thare heads
and looked Ashamed

Ten Pounds
life is preshous
strange
and undesirable

behave

in fucher





73


33


this time the drink had begun to die and the currage with it, so the sailors seeing that thay were bet and ashamed of it in thare sober senses, got Mr Jebson to take A note to the captian. offer to do work on enny terms, hoping that he would forgive them. he said that he would let them now of in the morning and they was to go to bed in the mean time and get right rested. So thay went. several of young men in the steerage was as bad as the sailors for been drunk. now the wind as settled little. the rain settling the sea, so we must work and look out through this dreary night.

Satterday April 12th 1862
the Night as passed well. there as been plenty of rain the wind as abated down to A nice breese. we have put out most sail this morning the Captian sent for the sailors aft poor fellows thay hung thare heads down and looked Ashamed of their Job. He told them that thay was all ready for 3 months Impresonment but he would forgive them if thay was well behaved in fucher. except 2 or 3 which he will punish when we get to canterbury, for the loss of the box, &c. – so we have got reliv of our duty Lattude 37 – Longetude 3-W. you will think think these strange and undisirable circumstance so thay are, but life is preshous and it wont do to give in to A little matter. this after noon the captian as put out A paper – Like this. Ten pounds reward, some person haveing brokeing into and takeing from the fore hatch some sperits on, or about Thursday the 11th of April. the above reward will be given to enny person or persons who will
give



poor fellows
hung thare heads
across the dark blue sea

dark the night
Ten pounds reward
poor company






74


34



from Christ
the power
of god

first rate
he gave
first rate

And wise
all was
And wise

so cold
betwen decks
and large

atentive
and quite
very quite

than the
Minister
be changed
to Night

this morn
ing as
before

so we
had as
before

but we dont like insulting





75


34



A little Stranger haded
as meny Souls we are
in number to our compny
as we was as when before


give sush Infonnation as will lead to the conviction of the offenders. Eather here or at Lythington – sined Captian Foster – Mate – so that it seems that the grog was stolen, which makes the case worse; there is A good Faverable wind to day

Sunday April 13th 1862
Lattude 38-22. Longetude 14 Miles E. good wind. makeing from 10 to 12 Nots per hour. this morning the Minister had service as before, but he changed the after noon service to Night but we dont Like Insulting, so we have had our service as before, only we had it betwen main decks. it is so cold we had A very large compny, much larger than the minister. Mr Jebson gave us A first rate sennon from Christ the power of god and the wisdom of god. all was very quite and atentive.

Monday April 14 1862
Lattude 39-38. Longetude 4-22E. the wind remains good west or S. W. enny wind is good for us from N. to S. Westward round About 10 o clock this morning the captian sent for one sailor called charly Aft when he came, he was put In Irons for steaIing. it was him that threw the box over – bord on friday last. his things have been Examed and several stolen things have been found. to day A little Stranger was haded to our compny so that we are as meny Souls in number as we was when we left london.

Tuesday April 15th 1862
Lattude 41-17 – Longetude 8-10-E Strong N.W. wind going from 10 to 13 Nots per hour. showers of rain from 8 A.M ail day. after very cold. N. wind. to night it is going round to Aft – or North.


been found
Examed
and several things
threw over-bord
for stealing






76


35



to
night
it
is
going
round
to
west

N.W.
as
we
are
sail­
ing
S.E.

East
the
wind
is
S.W.

we
are
sail­
ing
S.E.
by
East

to
wards

by
night
it
got
more
S.

nearly

S.
or
North





77


35



we make yeast this way.
of water,
of sugar,
do of flour
up in A bottle
will rise
over night


Wednesday April 16th 1862
Lattude 42 – Longetude 11-43 – E. the wind is N.W. and that is right aft as we are sailing S.E. very fine and pleasent to day. to Night it is going round to West –

Thursday April 17th 1862
Lattude 42-12 – Longetude 11-23-E. the wind is S.W. we are sailing S.E.by East. to wards night it got more S. and very Strong so that all top Royal sails and an royal and square do. alonge with the Jibs and stay sails had to be reefed. to the List of A persons outfitt I would add cloths cord, pegs, rowling pin, Baking spitel, water proof hat, A coat, Leggens, boots, and nut-meg grater – peper box. we make yeast this way. 1/2 pint of water, a table spoon of sugar, do. of flour 24 hours up in A botel. that will rise 1/2 stone over night.

Good Friday April 18th 1862
Lattude 40-30 – Longetude 18-46-E – Nearly S. wind. very strong sailing as we was yesterday. this morning we well rember home and the Lads with thire merry bells and toungs all calling hot cross buns – we should like to have heard them upon our decks I am sure thay would have had plenty of custermers but we must do without them while we get ashore – the weather gets very cold indeed. Since we left london we have had plenty of danceing and all sortes of games every day the weather would alow but now it gets to cold and rough. I forgot to name that a few days ago we caught some aldertrosses (or cape sea birds) thay got them
for



very strong
as we was yesterday
very Strong
alonge with the Jibs and stay
sails reefed
to the List of A persons outfitt
add rowling pin
proof hat
Leggens
boots
and nut-meg grater
cloths
cord
rags
that’s that




merry bells and toungs
all calling hot cross buns





78


36



every appearance
of a storm
in the first and 2nd cabben

all my business
here below
to cry
behold the Lamb.

at least by Example.

the conduct of A meny
I cant understand
nor yet concurring

some have drunk
and smoked
and gambled
since we left London

so thay are getting hard up

rafferling
and selling
all there things
sush as concertias
guns
boots
and Estra clothing





79


36



A rough day
A wet day

sea rowling
mountians high

verry strong
appearance of
A storm
same as
before


for stuffin. thay were 10 feet from one wing point to the other. Since we left london some have drunk and smoked and gambled very much so that thay are getting hard up. for some time thay have been rafferling and selling all kinds of there things, sush as concertias, guns, boots and Estra clothing. this almost all applies to the first and 2nd cabben the conduct of A meny of the professing christians on bord I cant understand nor yet concuring, an the subjects I have named In this day date. for I feel that it is all my business here below to cry behold the Lamb. at least by example. this morning one other Little stranger boy was haded to our compny. it is the son of the Minister Mr Gifferd. towards night the wind got much stronger nearly all sail had to be reefed. every appearance of A storm –

Satterday April 19th 1862
Lattude 40-36 – Longetude 23-36-E – verry strong S.W. wind and heavy sea rowling mountians high. plenty of rain In squals. upon the whole it as been A very rough day. You will see by the longetude that we crossed the Longetudinal Line on satterday last. when we crossed we had the same time as Grinwich time since then we have gained from 15 to 25m – the 24 Hours.

Sunday April 20th 1862
Lattude 39-57 – Longetude 25-45-E – wind and sea as settled down to A nasty wet day. the wind had gone round ftom S.W. to N.E. Last night. it is getting round now to W. after dinner A nice west wind got up. towards night the wind as settled down we are rocking very much. to day we have had the same services as before except that the minister changed the night
service



aldentross

10 feet
from one point to the other

for stuffin




one other
Little stranger
boy was handed
to our compny





80


37



Lattude 41-0­-
Longetude 18-11-E­-
During the night
we have rocked much
backwards
and forwards.

Lattude 41-48­-
Longetude 33-47­-
last night
we have rowled much
the wind
as increased

Lattude 41-48­-
Longetude 38-33E­-
last night
we shipt 2 seas
the gaile
is at its height

Lattude 43-45­-
Longetude 43-35-E­-
to night
the wind is very stong
we have
set down a bit





81


37



instead of 7
to 1/2 past 7

go to both
in order
the power of
in order of



hail stons
2 seas
small sail


service to 1/2 past 7 – instead of 7 – so that persons could go to both in order. Mr Jebson gave us A first rate sermon from To know christ and the power of is resurecktion. it was A good time we had A large compy –

Monday April 21st 1862
Lattude 41-0 – Longetude 28-12-E – During the night we have rocked much. this morning there is little wind and plenty of wet. it changes several points In A few hours. backwards and forwards. About noon A nice N.W. brese got up.

Tuesday April 22nd 1862
Lattude 41-48 – Longetude 33-47 – very strong wind and heavy sea. rowled very much last night. it is fine to day To night the wind as increased to a galle. it is from the right quarter for us though the sea rowls mountians high and knoc us About A very deal. we are caring very little sail. pleanty of hall and showers of rain.

Wedensday April 23th 1862
Lattude 42-48 – Longetude 38-33E – very strong wind and stonney. the gale seems to be at its height. it is very cold we have had showers of very large hall stons. last night we shipt 2 very heavy seas.

Thursday April 24th 1862
Lattude 43-45 – Longetude 43-35-E. – settled down A little so we have more sail on. to night the wind is very strong

Friday April 25th 1862
Lattude 44-11 – Longetude 48-20-E – During Last
night



high mountians
knoc us
About
A deal






82


38



sea rowlls mountians high it is fine today strong wind and a heavy sea rowled ve





83


38


journeys end

looking to
of wonder
as to what

or when
we are getting on well

daily
if is asket how
far have gone last day
how
far
we have to go

All are looking
full of wonder

the wind is on our side

to catch the mail
next
mail

when I shall write
derect

after that
I write
alternative
to you





84


38



you will not get
not enny description

of the place
or how we like

untill next mail


night I was on watch it was very squaly. some of them was very heavy though of short duration. this morning we had A heavy snow storm but it soon passed over. the wind continues good –

Satterday April 26th 1862
Lattude 45-20 – Longetude 53-12-E – this morning the wind as settled down with the sea so that we have A strong wind and nice sea. though the wind is on our side we are getting on well it is asket dally how far gone last day and how far we have to go All are looking to there journeys end full of wonder as to what or when we shall get. very fine cold – and bracing –

Sunday April 27th 1862
Lattude 43-24 – Longetude 56-55-E. this morning very strong wind almost Ahead. though we can sail with it, and rather heavy sea most of saIl had to be reefed tonight. to day we have had the services as before Mr Jebson gave us A good sermon from thare 3 in heaven and 3 on earth. if ye recive the witness of men the word of god is grater – it was A very good time but we cant retire to A good prayer meeting or home to think over ther what we have heard, but we have to sir down to enny sort of conversation whitch enny ungodly man may introduce

Monday April 28th 1862
Lattude 42-43 – Longetude – 60-7-E – the wind continus strong from the same quarter. we expect that we shall just get to New Zealand in time to catch the mail, if so you will not get enny discriptlon of the place or how we like untill next mail when I shall write derect to father struthers after that I intend to write alternative
to



A very good time

3 in heaven
3 on earth

the word of god is grater

we cant retire
home to think

to pray
to sit down later

to enny sport
whictch enny man

may question
as debater






85


39



the whole truth
I have sent
to you and

you must pass
to them and
they to you

send them
to you
as soon as

A copy of
At once

A whole account
A true account

of Lattude
and of Longetude

the state of wind
and weather

as it is
on bord
up to the present

not named
all scabbles
all small matters

A bit
or better worse

read it
and form some idea

At once





86


39



flaycrows
in the heads
of those
who never saw
the sea
or Els
was never on it


to you and them so you must pass your letters to them and thay must send them to you as soon as you both can, I want you to keep this Log (both parts) but give them A copy of it At once. by reading it you may form some idea of A sea voyge. I have sent you the whole truth. I have not attempted to make it look A bit better or A bit worse but according to my judgement. I have sent you the account as it is. Off course I have not named all little scabbles or petty matters but I have carefully given you (as well as I was Able) A true account of Lattude and Longetude, the state of wind and weather, and all the princeapall things on bord up to the present so far as the sea voyge is concerned I dont rue coming but I am astonished at peopel makeing so much Ado about A voyge and the like for most of flaycrows are in the heads of peopel who never saw the sea or els thay was never on it except A cock boat, so thay may fancy from that what A long sea voyge must be. of course I belive that A good bit depends upon the choice of ships as A meny of the cheap Liverpool Johns are not fit to carry pigs much less men and wemen from what I can learn and see I believe that Willis gann &c – is A very good firm and can be depended on. As for our state of health, I was never better for 3 months in my life. Hannah as been changeable as you will have seen in reading this. Arthur (poor Lad) as been very prostrated. in fact we thought once that we should have lost him, but thay have both got over it and seem all the better for there sickness. Arthur begins to get very fat and wilder than ever, he is very free with meny passinges on bord. I belive that he would have walked before now but for the rowling of the ship – he has begun to say A meny words already. so far a real comfert is concerned we dont come of bord
ship



Thay have both
got over it

Arthur
would have walked
by now

but for
the rowling
of the ship

to say
A meny words
already

and be free
with meny
passinges


Flaycrow: dialect, ( N Br. )
a worrier
a persistent gossiper of the negative






87


40



going out
should write
to see
a berth
enclosed
for themselves

state the beds required
the room and the price.

that way
can be cleaner
and safer
for thare things
more comfertable.

upon the whole
are clean
and clere.

you cant keep as clean
as you Could like

there is part lice
&c.
cant help getting some
to put up with.





88


40



I think
I have not named
several Aged cuples
on bord
going to there sons

or with there children
to comence

some Appers
to be Above 60

years old
and infirmed

so we expect our parents
to cheer up.


ship to find that there are A meny things to put up with. you cant keep as clean as you Could like and there is part lice &c. and we cant help getting some. but upon the whole our ship and compy are considered very_clean and c1ere. A family going out should write to the shipping Agents at London to see what thay could get An enclosed berth for themselves state the number of family and the beds requared. then thay will tell you the Amount of room and the price. family been to gather that way can be much cleaner and safer for thare things. thay have privilege for thare boxes if wanted in there berths and are all to gather more comfortable. I forgot to name that the minister yesterday morning babtised the first little stranger Boy, caIling him Stephen Zealandia – I think that I have not named that there are several Aged cuples on bord going to there sons or going out with there children to comence. some Appers to be Above 60 years old and infirmed, so we expect our parents to cheer up.

Tuesday April 29th 1862
Lattude 42-04 – Longetude 64-0-E – During last night the wind settled A good bit and got more W. so it is very pleasant to day though we are sailing verry slow.

Wednesday April 30th 1862
Lattude 42-54 – Longetude 68-21-East – Last night the wind got good and we went at A fine rate. to day it as changed to S.W. but we are sailing well. to night it is very squaly we have had some heavy showers of hail and snow


stranger Boy

Stephen Zealandia
the first

babtised






89


41





All sail reefed Except
topsails, (that is the
second sails from the
Deck) thay are part

(this is the order of the sails.
the first from the Deck and
it is the Largest it is called
the Square or main Sail, it

the 2nd top sail

3rd Royal,

5th Sky sail.

ALL THE 3 DIFFERANT SETS OF SAIL ARE KNOWN THIS WAY.
THE FIRST IN THE SHIP ARE CALLED FORE SAILS.
THE 2ND OR MIDDEL LOT ARE CALLED MAIN SAILS.
THE LAST [OR AFT] ARE CALLED AFT SAILS



the square sail that is
put out from behind
the aft Mast Longway
s is called Spanker in


those that go from Mast to Mast are called stay
those along the bows of the ship are called Jils
thay are all for side side winds and are used on


thare are some which thay
extend out square from the
sails over the sea when the
little wind called stunsails


TO NIGHT WE HAVE GOT OUT FORE
MAIN SQUARE SAIL PART REEFED





90


41


Thursday May 1st 1862
Lattude 42-39 – Longetude 71-36-East – During Last night the wind blew into a gail. A heavy rowling sea and strong head winds keeping us off course 7 points – this forenoon it changed round towards S.W. so we are nearer our course. though the gale continues we have all sail reefed Except topsail, ( that is the second sails from the Deck.) and thay are part reefed. (this is the order of the sails. the first from the deck and it is the Largest it is called Square or main Sail. the 2nd top sail, 3rd Royal 4th top Royal, 5th Sky sail. all the 3 differant Sets of sail are known this way. the first in the ship are called fore sails. the 2nd or middel Lot are called Main Sails. the Last (or Aft) are called aft sails. the square sail that is put out from behind the aft Mast Longeways is called Spanker. those that go from Mast to Mast are called stay sails. those along the bows ofthe ship are called Jils. thay are all for side winds. thare are some which thay extend out suqare from the sails over the sea when there is little wind, called stunsails. to Night we have got out fore and Main square sail, part reefed

Friday May 2nd 1862
Lattude 41-44 – Longetude 74-40 – Last night was the Roughest Night that we have had on bord. thay was no sleep for us. rocked, heaved and pitched with an head wind, wave after wave went over us all the Night. we are lying rearer our course to day. the sea is very heavy.

Satterday May 3th 1862
Lattude 40-49 Longetude 76-20 – we are braced up to the wind though the sea is rather heavy.
yet






91


42



and of a sound mind
not fear

(days of head wind as dishartined)

of love

and of power
to see land once more

we are 2 points of our course

if it please the Lord
give us favearable wind
every one
godly and ungodly
sigh Amen

And so it was
the order given
chopt round

praise God





92


42



the order given
square the yards
(or sails)

the wind as got more Aft
going well and steady


yet the gale as settled A good bit. we are out of our course some points to night we are 2 points of our course.

Sunday May 4th 1862
Lattude 40-29 – Longetude 78-20 – the wind is still A strong head wind. we keep braced up to it with no more sail on so we are makeing little head way. we are 2 points of our course. we have had the services as before. Mr Jebson gave us A good sermon to A Large and Attentive congargation from For god hath not given us the spirit of fear, but of power, and of Love, and of A sound mind. the last few days of head wind as dlshartined A meny as we begin to want to see land once more. on sunday night Mr Jebson prayed very earnestly (that If it pleased the Lord) he would give us favearable wind. every one, godly and ungodly sighed or seald Amen. And so it was. while we was yet praying we heard the order given square the yards or sails. we knew that the wind had suddenly chopt round in our faver. praise God.

Monday May 5 1861
Lattude 40-20 – Longetude 82-35-E. the wind as got yet more in our faver and the sea as settled A good bit we had put out more sail. we are salling well, all day.

Tuesday May 6th 1862
Lattude 41-17 Longetude 86-35-E. this morning the wind as got more Aft. we have all square sail out and are going on well and steady. it is A very flne and comfertable day.

Wednesday May 7th 1862
Lattude 42-52 – Longetude-91-10-E last night
the



the wind as got
more in our faver
the sae as settled
sailing well

praise God for a
comfertable
A fine day






93


43



Abroked down women


Acatolict


she diedabout 1/2
10


Awoke


by screaming

grouning

howling


all strange to me

not weeping


Akind ofA

got up yelling


lighted all night

At sunset we buried her


in the longest expanse of water that there is in the whole world





94


43



About this time
we are wondering
if you have got our Log.

we hope you have

no dough you wonder
if we have landed

ours is a long passage

nought Els scarcely
but head winds
and light Aft winds


the wind kept aft though it changed A point or 2 backwards and forwards. to day we have A nice Light steady wind still aft. it is A very fine day. About this time we are wondering if you have got our letter or Lot: that we sent by the winslow. of course we hope you have. you will no dough have wondered meny A time If we have got landed, but ours is rather A long passage. we have had nought Els scarely but head winds and light Aft winds so we was not Able to get Along as we could like.

Thursday May 8th 1862
Lattude 43-35 Longetude 95-26-E last Night the wind was light untill 12 P.M. after that it got strong. it still continues to day a nice brise. we are sailing well to day. Arthur and hannah is rather porly to day. we wish we had brought some brandy. peopet going out ought to bring some and A few doz bottles of Ale or stought as things of that sort are bad to get on bord and we need sometiems. thay are very dear on bord. the new Zealand hanbook states that you are not alowed to bring enny but our captan says that we are.

Friday May 9th 1862
Lattude 44-55 Longetude 100-15-E. – During the last few days we have had an irish women in the hospitle she is about 47 years old though she looked A broked down old women. as A husband and 4 children on bord, and Left one at home. by prefeshen A catolict. she died rather suddenly last night about 1/2 10. I had just got to sleep but was Awoke by the screaming, grouning and howling of the family and husband, all strange to me, not real weeping
but



the wind kept aft
it changed A point
or 2 backwards
& forwards

light steady wind
still aft

it is A
very fine day

nice brise




we wish we had brought some brandy
and A few doz bottles of Ale or stought


we need sometiems
and are alowed
the captan says


the hanbook says
are not





95


44



part rain
A good bit

all in our faver
very fare
and strong

sailing well
to wards night

grate Multtude
our compny
Large and attentive
A congregation

A show
I saw
of all the wemens work
all day
untile 3

very good
very strong

moast





96


44



to day
a littile
stranger Girl
joined us
on the quarter


A kind of A got up yelling. thay had lighted candles all night with her. At sunset to day we solemnly buried her in the largest expance of water that there is in the whole world. the wind cuntinues good All day.

Satterday May 10th 1862
Lattude 46-29 – Longetude 105-41-E Last night the wind got very strong and on the beams. most sail had to be reefed. it lasted untile 3 to day it changed with a shower of rain on to the quarter

Sunday May 11th 1862
Lattude 47-35 Longetude 110-40 all day we have sailed with A strong N.W. wind. part sail stowed. we have had the serverices as before . Mr.Jebson gave us A good sermon from And I saw A grate Multtude &c to A Large and attentive congergation –

Monday May 12th 1862
Lattude 48-16 Longetude 117-21-E. During last night we had moast sail stowed as the wind was very strong this morning the wind as changed to W. we are sailing well. got littile more sail on. to wards night the wind as settled A good bit. to day A little stranger Girl joined our compny.

Tuesday May 13th 1862
Lattude 47-56 Longetude 122-36 – the wind is as last night, all in our faver, on the quarter, part rain to day we have an Auction and A show of all the young wemens work.

Wednesday May 14th 1862
Lattude 48-17 Longetude 128-48 – the wind is W. very good all day. to noght it is very fare and strong wind. things begin to look as though
we



we have had
the serverices
as before
Mr Jebson
gave us
A large congergation
A grate Multtude
and attentive






97


45



A dead dry tale
as some sise
amongst the rest
as proved

he knew nothing
after all

beginning to be willing
as soon
as thay like
and have part frinds

I have bought stought
for saving grace
but what is that
compared with helth
and strength
with plenty of mony
be examed
be kindly
be landed
and joined to our compny
of predersessers

that will be wanted
and got ready

or course it runs Away





98


45



night after night
he has maintained
the truth
as it is written
that
prior to the state of grace
he knew nothing


we was getting near land the Anker and cheans, Ladders &c &c – things that will be wanted at landing are been examed and got ready we are beginning to be very willing to be landed as soon as thay like. though time looks short, and we have part frinds – that we shall feel parting with each other. after all. Hannah and Arthur are nearly better now. I have bought stought for her. she finds it do her good more than enny thing that she can take. of course it runs Away with plenty of mony – but what is that compared with helth and strength. this morning A little stranger Boy was joined to our compny belonging to one of the first class caben passingers.

Thursday May 15th 1862
Lattude 48-35 Longetude 135-12-E. – no change in the wind. we are sailing well, this week gaining about 1/2 hour per day. on Sunday Night last the Rev. Mr Gifferd church of England Minister, preached from 18th verse of the 8 chapter of Romans, of course the sermon was much like its predersessers, A dead dry tale but still there was A remark or 2 which as got him much opposition and made carickter clear before us. In the very face of the preceeding verse he told us that we could not know our sins forgiven, neather did the Apostle Paul. on monday morning one of the first class passingers begun the debate with him. Mr. Jebson was drawn into it at night. night after night he has maintained the truth as it is written. untill it as assumed some sise amongst the rest he as proved that the disciples was not in A state of grace prior to the desent of the holy ghost. Rev. Mr Gifferd was kindly assured that he knew nothing about saveing grace, but
that




A remark or 2
which as got him
much opposition

and made carickter
clear before us

in the very face
of the preceeding verse
after all






99


46



very Cold today

rather warm
in the cabin
on the subject

I got no profet under them
all the Legs from under them

I have heard little
derrect on the debate

of trade or profet

of the ladies in the cabin

so ends the matter
for the present

A cheerful tone as come over all





100


46



strong winds
heavy seas
it is with us
it helps us on
and we dont feel it heavy


that he preached as A matter of trade or profet. Some of the church ladies in the cabin have come out rather warm on this subject, so ends the matter – for the present Mr Jebson haveing knocked all the Legs from under them. I have heard very littel of is preaching as I got no profet under them.

Friday May 16th 1862
Lattude 48-56 Longetude 141-28-E Strong aft wind with very heavy sea though it is with us so it helps us on and we dont feel it heavy. to night it is one of the heavyest seas that we have yet . about 10 P.M. the wind got onto the quarter.

Satterday May 17th 1862
Lattude 48-48 – Longetude 147-40-E. good strong wind all day. During last night A little stranger Girl Joined our compny belonging to the first caben. very Cold to day.

Sunday May 18th 1862
Lattude 49-20 Longetude 153-57-E. Strong wind fare on the quarter, sailing well to day. during the forenoon the wind changed to Aft. we have had the services as before. Mr Jebson gave us A good sermon from – And he sead unto them, have ye recived the holy ghost since ye belived. A first rate sermon baring derrect on the weeks debate proved clearly that no one could be Adopted into !1ods familv nor yet han is sins forgiven and not know.

Monday May 19th 1862
Lattude 49-12 Longetude 160-42 – Strong winds on the quarter all day. sailing N.E. by East we are getting very near our Jurneys end so that all are very glad. A cheerful tone as come over all.


getting near
our Jurneys end
so all are glad






101


47



lookers out for land

sought of stward islands
traps and snares
from riggen

Joy filled all hearts

though no one can see it
wet and cold
was rocks

looking out for land

wind been Ahead
untill dark
to the enterance of the hay
off littelton

saw lights
was glad

A wild looking Mountinous country
all togather splended.

Espesley
the Apparance
of the penesula





102


47



droped
Anker close
right against
good though low



snow on top
grass and wood
3 cots
grand


Tuesday May 20th 1862
Lattude 48-18 Longetude 165-50-E. sailed well all last night. to day the wind as fallen A little. plenty of Lookers out for land. About 3 P.M. it was anounced that there was rocks calted the traps and snares sought of stward islands to be seen from the riggen. Joy filled all hearts at such news – meny went on to deck to get the first glince of enny singls of Land. thay are 400 feet heigh

Wednesday May 21st 1862
Lattude 47-5 Longetude 170-48 E. wind still good though low. every one looking out for land as we was sailing off stwerds Iland in the distance though no one can see it. very wet and cold.

Thursday May 22nd 1862
At 12 to day we was 25 Miles off littelton with wind right against us entering the port. at 8 A.M. land was seen and all the rest of the day we sailed close up to it untill we reached the entrence of the Bay. the wind been Ahead we could not go up. we tacked about untill dark when we droped Anker close to the enterance of the bay, 10 miles off littelton. to night there is no wind hardly. About 7 P.M. we saw lights on the sea which soon proved to be A pilot boat with pilot we was very glad. After Asking the questions about helth &c – thay came on bord for the night. the Apparance of Banks peninsula we very much loved. it is A wild looking Mountinous country the top covered with snow, looking all togather splended. Espesley to us who as not seen land for 15 weeks all the rest of them covered with grass and wood. we saw 3 grand little cots on the
penesula



at such news
went on deck
to get first glance
of enny singls
of land






103


48



plenty
pigs and wild goats

(of ducks and other birds
to be seen on the sea)

You have no Idia
of the pleasent countenances
and laughing faces
there is when we see land –

(we could not see littelton as yet)

today the commy hoze came on bord
and the raport went press.
all is excitement
every boddy so pleased
that thay cant tell what to do
with themselves

we are not sea sick
but sick of the sea

in the midst of the rejoicing





104


48



death is doing his work
beastly drunk
pasted
at 11
he was dead

it throws a sadness
on the company
at 1

to bed


penesula and plenty of wild pigs and goats.you have no Idia of the pleasant countinances and laughing faces there is when we see land – for we are not sea sick but sick of the sea for the present there is know plenty of Ducks and other birds to be seen on the sea

Friday May 23rd 1862
This morning again we let go Anker. the wind is still as it was so we tacked about A long while getting nearer thought we could not get In. after dinner A small tug steamer came to our help and by dark we droped anker 2 miles ofT the whartT we could not see littelton as yet. during the day the commy hoze came on bord. we all passed and the raport went press. ail is excitement, every boddy so pleased that thay cant tell what to do with themselves, meny going on shore to have supper part frelnds of the passingers came on bord to spend the night but In the midst of all the rejoicing some have to mourn – death is doing his work. one little fellow 9 years old pasted away about 11 o clock. the docter was beastley drunk when he came to see him, but he was dead. it throws A little sadness upon the compny. I got to bed about 1 o clock in the morning

Satterday May 24th 1862
During last night very few slept with the thoughts of Landing or getting ready. Early this morning ail were on the stir Early every boddy packing up and getting ready. about 8 A.M A steamer came long side. A very menny boxes was put on her, then we went on bord. About 10 we steamed ofT for the wharf. as we steamed along we saw some of the grandest little cottages and squares of land that every I
saw



few slept
thoughts of Landing
getting ready
all on stir
every boddy packing
getting ready
steamed off






105


49



that every I saw in my life
full sight

shineing sun
little-ton

the prettest littel town
that ever an Iye fell on

we cheered loudly
we cheered very loud
this grand little place

instead of mud
and old wooding houses
and bad roads

thay dont know
what A wooden house his

if thay saw
they would change their Idia

I cannot give enny discription of it
you must come to see it
then you will know it





106


49



saw one of the prettest littel towns that ever an Iye fell on we saw one of the prettest littel towns that ever an Iye





107


49


saw in my life. very soon we turned the point and was in full sight of littleton. the sun was shineing and it was very warm we was very much disopointed at the sight. for instead of finding mud and old wooding houses and bad roads we saw one of the prettest littel towns that ever an lye fell on – we cheered loudly as we left the Zealandia – and when we saw this grand little place, we cheered very Loud. people at home turn up there noses at the words wooden house but thay dont know what A wooden house his. if thay saw the houses and shops thay would change their Idia about them. there are A few build of rought red stone out of the mountians Lyttleton is built on the slope of the some mountians – no way as yet from it Except going over them or by sea I cannot give enny discription of it to please myself so you must come to see It, then you will know all about It. after getting somthing to eat we got our boxes up to the Barwlckes. this afternoon we drew rations from the barwlcks though we have to fetch it from the shops. thay allow per day to Each person 1 bl bread – do Meat – do pottatoes one ounce of tea – do sugar and all are very good and fresh ( 1/2 pint Milk and Arrowroot Extra for Arthur.) bisides rations for him like the rest. Meny of our peopel have drunk to night, but we have got a nice littel compny in A room to our selves so that we are quite to our­selves.

Sunday May 25th 1862
this Morning we are getting ready for chapel though I shall have to go in my cord trowes as we have not got all off bord. At 1/2 past 10 I sat in the wesleyan chapel – littelton. it is the pritest
place



thay allow per day

1 bl bread
– do Meat
– do potatoes

one ounce of tea
– do sugar
Arrowroot for Arthur
besides rations
like the rest

and all are very good
and fresh






108


50



the pritest place
I every saw
neat beauty

it is gothick

built like a church
with a spire

in the moming
while I was listinging
from he that belivef
hath the witness

I thought you would be selling
pottatos
or hung bugs
or the like

it would be satterday night with you

we are before your time





109


50



litlel-ton on one
the plains on the other

looks grand
it is quite Levil

first rate cuntry


place that every I saw. I never saw one like it at home for neat beauty it is gothick built like A church with a low light spire. thay have A mixed service in the morning, while I was listinging to A first rate discourse from he that belivef in god hath the witness in him self, I thought that you would be selling out pottatos or hung bugs or the like as it would be about 1/2 past 11 satterday night with you, as we are 11 hours and 40M before your time. in the after noon we went unto the mountian to have a look at canterbury plains. from the top littelton looks grand on one side and the plains on the other. we can see for over 30 miles it is quite Levil. My wife likes the cuntry first rate Arthur Laughes at every thing he sees. to night we had A first rate sermon from Rev Mr Shaw. he is A Yorkshire man from sowerby bridge. I was very much pleased with some things here for istance the the shops are without shuters, only blinds cover the windows to keep the goods from showing. there is no fear of life or property. Every boddy has plenty hear. therefore there is no need to beg or steal. then there is no drinks of enny kind sold on A sunday if thy sell A glass thay are fined not less than 50£. so that sundays are very quite here and the places of worship well attended.

Monday My 26th 1862
to day we have got out boxes on bord the steamer ready for to morrow to go to christchurch, we have got Licence to import our guns thay cost 1s each

Tuesday My 27th 1862
this morning we are off to christchurch, it is
rather




plenty hear
no fear of life or property
no need to beg or steal

no shuters
only blinds
to keep the goods from showing






110


51



bailey
to seek me
from Yorkshire
st gorges
at Leeds

10s per day
8 hours

at 8
at 5

a carpenter

to commence
so I shall
in the mong

thay dont breake there necks
but smoke
and worke gently





111


51



A hard English frost
strongest
since thay came

A wild week
before we came
A dark lookin
and snowing
though it does not stop

A cold wet winters day


rather cold and dull. it is a long ride down the mountians. when we got to the steam wharf we had 3 miles to walk to the barwlcks our boxes came up after with the drays and Oxen

Wednesday My 28th 1862
to day it is A cold wet winters day A rathe dark lookin

Thursday May 29th 1862
this morning it is snowing though it does not stop. it cleared up in the forenoon so I set off to see the cuntry it is a splen country. I went as far Kaipoi 12 miles it is a nice riseing port – part of the land betwen Christchurch and it is wild thoug sold. I slept all night at Kaipoi

Friday May 30th 1862
this morning it is A hard English frost. the Old Colonist tells us it is the strongest thay have had since thay came, though it was A wild week before we came. to day I returned to Christchurch and found that A Marster carpinter had been to seek me. is name is bailey he is from yorkshire he had the manadgement of st gorges parsnage at Leeds. tell Alfred that Mr Seainar that works with Mr britons is my Masters wifes uncle. all the trades have 10s per dy of 8 hours we commence at 8 A.M and leave off at 5 P.M thay dont breake there necks over it, but smoke and worke gently.

Tuesday June 3rd 1862
we are yet at the barwicks as we cannot get an house for Love or money. my tools have not yet Landed but master wants me to commence so I shall in the mong thay have allowed us rations
for



Kaipoi
a nice riseing port
wild
thoug sold






112


52



1st
I hope it will last
that is a saving

the time for saveng

2nd
I hope you show it
like sons ought you say

thay are at home

3rd
I think you will get your belle full
glad that you squared things

dear and scarse moast thing

4th
I hope that he will soon be out
if they who told would pay

as money to lend on hand

5th
poor fancy Ellis
God bless her.

I forgot to name

6th
very glad
that I was remembered

tell her it was A laugh

7th
Aunts rabbit wont do hear
for peopel live here

9th
keeps is tail
as well is head





113


52



A bout
A boundend
A laugh not
A smile
A sk William


for 9 days so that is a saveng – rent here is very dear. coals dear and scarse. moast thing seem to be About duble the price thay are at home Except flour it is 14s per 100, potatoes 3s-6d to 4s do – Meat from 6d to 8 per pound. but every thing ought to be bought in Large quantetis, then thay are very cheap, but very dear if thy are bought in retail prices. all things here are sold by Auction that is the time for saveing money. tea coffe, sugar &c about home prices Eggs 3s doz. fresh butter 1s – 8d per bl. I forgot to mane that I received 1 letter and 2 papers from Alfred last Wednesday. I was very glad to learn that all was well at home. 1st you say that William as money to lend on hand. I hope it will last. 2nd you say that you and Benjamin are fond of home. I hope you will show it like sons ought. 3rd you want A diary of the Voyge I think you will get your belle full when you have read this 4th poor Lad went away in det. I hope that he will soon be out and if the partes who told the tale would pay their own it would be better for the shop keepers. 5th poor fancy Ellis God bless her. 6th very glad that I was remembered at chapel 7th I pltty Mr Sheard and very glad that you squared things Aunts rabbit wont do hear for people live here better than I ever saw. food off all sorts is Aboundend. Ask William if Rich keeps is tail up as well as is head 9th Mother Expeced I should land with A smile. tell her it was A laugh and not A smile. you say that you sent papers I never recived enny things, eather letters or papers since I left Leeds except one from sister Mary Strother to london untill last wednesday when I got yours.


dear and scarce
duble the price
Except flour

– 4s do
– meat from 6d
– 8d per bl.

large quantetis
in retail prices
by Auction






114


53


we Left our native Land and
traveled
16000 Miles across
the dark blue sea

A long passage

know
make an end
of Log
in letter

3 deaths
5 berths

106 Day it was

menny changes
had
to this

as not come in yet
As you will see

I must





115


53


Sunday June 8th 1862
I must know make an end of Log writeing. And what I had to this must be in letter. we have Left our native Land and traveled some 16000 Miles across the dark blue sea. As you will see menny have been the changes in that time. we have had 3 Deaths and 5 berths, been out from the Downs 106 Day it was A long passage, but the Kingeston which left London the same day as not come in yet.


Yours Joseph Sowrys Barwicks
Christchurch
Canterbury
New Zealand





116


54


Song of the Wooding
Houses


under
long iron
paint-baked
blue as above
peaked and spouted
proof at the sun
flashed for rising
on new life
and old

in
wood-clad walls
contained
to need expand
contract
repaired to need
to loss required
to want

windows
clear as air

on
hard-wood
pile block stone
or concrete found virginal
as a tent
on a new camp ground
portable
secure site and
ground floor
found

power piped

and
paint
and
porch
and
path

free people

hold us in
(for now)





© Leicester Kyle, 1997



No comments:

Post a Comment